Michelle! I checked the plugin which is called “All in one WP Migration” and it will create a compressed file of your entire site including media and database from any WordPress installation. I used it a while ago to move a friends site to another server and seemed to work very well. Totally free too. If you have bought your domain name somewhere else, all you need to do is update the nameservers in your account with the domain provider. No need to bother with WA anymore. Personally I would use wayback archive to copy the original site and build a new one somewhere else. As most of your work is probably writing you could simply copy and paste each page and create a new one. Shouldn’t take too much time unless you have thousands of posts!
Can you run a successful business by only using the free membership option at Wealthy Affiliate? Well, you can, but I wouldn’t recommend it. Instead, I recommend you sign up for the free Wealthy Affiliate membership as a way to try things out. Honestly, the free membership is set up to be a bit of a teaser to get you to sign up for premium eventually, but most of us expect that going in. What’s nice about it is you can judge for yourself, based on the free membership, whether it is worth it for you to sign up for premium. Ultimately, only you can decide if Wealthy Affiliate is high quality or not. You will get more than enough of an idea by signing up for their free membership option. On average, about 1 in every eight people upgrade to a premium membership.
After you find an affiliate network with merchants that match your niche, the next step is to make sure you can earn high commissions from your sales. Remember, average affiliate commissions (depending on vertical) range from 5-30%. When you scan the list of merchants, do some math on potential earnings and product prices so that you maximize your revenue.
This is the bait-and-switch that Wealthy Affiliate pulls on new members. It is called WEALTHY Affiliate, wealthy being a synonym of RICH. So, everyone who signs up is indeed hoping to be shown how to make a lot of money, then they get told: sorry, don’t expect to get rich any time soon. It’s kind of like signing up to Weight Watchers and then being told, “It’s going to take you ages to lose weight. You’ll probably stay overweight for a long time. But since you’re here, why don’t you pass the time by chatting to the other overweight people.”
A 2010 study by the Direct Marketing Association reports that in 2010, marketers —commercial and nonprofit—spent $153.3 billion on direct marketing, which accounted for 54.2% of all ad expenditures in the United States. Measured against total US sales, these advertising expenditures generated approximately $1.798 trillion in incremental sales. In 2010, direct marketing accounted for 8.3% of total US gross domestic product. In 2010, there were 1.4 million direct marketing employees in the US. Their collective sales efforts directly supported 8.4 million other jobs, accounting for a total of 9.8 million US jobs.[5]
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