Being a current premium member of WA since 2015, active on and off mostly off, but hosting three sites with them, two professional and one monetized, I was expecting to thoroughly disagree with your review; however, I was in many respects surprised and pleased. For the most part, it was insightful and spot-on and while I do see and agree with many of your assertions, I don’t necessarily agree with your conclusion.
I’ve found with WA that it does give a good way to get people started in networking and building relationships. It’s a sound way of also learning the principles of affiliate marketing, where it’s done right and ethically. I do agree the platform itself is outdated and has been for some time. It’s ideal for those that are new, but doesn’t really serve a purpose for experienced marketers
They have this way to earn credits where you can offer feedback on other people’s sites. I’ve been there many times to try to make some WA credits and guess what? There’s never a site that needs reviewing. Sure there’s something fishy there. Sure their program showed me the basics of affiliate marketing but not much I couldn’t find elsewhere online. BTW, how do Kyle and Carlson reply to all the newcomers? It is some kind of AI bot that knows how to reply differently each time?

Yes, there is a lot to learn. I personally, have been willing to learn and do a lot of research in addition to the courses in WA to gain better understanding of things. I do that because I have the determination to not quit. I have been a member since 2015 and no, I have not had any earnings. However, I also recognize that I still have a lot of work to do and my inability to get some things completed sometimes can keep me from moving forward (like promoting via social media). But, I’m working on my own schedule going at my own pace and that is okay with me.
Improvements in transportation systems combined with the advent of the Uniform Penny Post in the mid-19th century provided the necessary conditions for rapid growth in mail order services.[11] In 1861, Pryce-Jones hit upon a unique method of selling his wares. He distributed catalogues of his wares across the country, allowing people to choose the items they wished and order them via post; he would then dispatch the goods to the customer via the railways. It was an ideal way of meeting the needs of customers in isolated rural locations who were either too busy or unable to get into Newtown to shop directly. This was the world's first mail order business, an idea which would change the nature of retail in the coming century.[12]
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