I’ve noticed that a lot of people who sign up for Wealthy Affiliate are those who are in dire need of financial help. They may have lost a job or may have suffered some other financial setback such as medical issues. The thing is, there’s no reason these people should stay away from Wealthy Affiliate, but many of them have this expectation that they can create a full-time income in a matter of weeks or even a few months. That is NOT the case. Remember, it takes an average business 3 years to profit. Fortunately, it will not take that long with an online business, but it will take considerable time and effort. If you need an income source fast, Wealthy Affiliate is not the place to provide that. Instead, Wealthy Affiliate teaches you how to build a real, sustainable online business over a period of time that will also last a long time.
Here are some additional pictures from the conference. This first picture is from the Wynn Hotel. Kyle and Carson, the owners of Wealthy Affiliate, rented out an incredible 2 story suite for us to party in. They had top shelf drinks, entertainment, mouth-watering food, and we were simply treated like ballers. Networking and making connections with these other successful affiliate marketers was invaluable.

I’m sure there are people making lots of money from affiliate marketing, but these probably tend to be people doing launch jacking. If you have no conscience and you want to earn lots of money, go for it. I’m sure it’s not actually that difficult to learn. Jeff Lenney has a blog post all about it. By the way, he’s the guy who got taken to court by WA for daring to write a negative review [Craig, feel free to remove that bit if you want].
A 2010 study by the Direct Marketing Association reports that in 2010, marketers —commercial and nonprofit—spent $153.3 billion on direct marketing, which accounted for 54.2% of all ad expenditures in the United States. Measured against total US sales, these advertising expenditures generated approximately $1.798 trillion in incremental sales. In 2010, direct marketing accounted for 8.3% of total US gross domestic product. In 2010, there were 1.4 million direct marketing employees in the US. Their collective sales efforts directly supported 8.4 million other jobs, accounting for a total of 9.8 million US jobs.[5]
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