I realize my bias is already showing through, so I’ll get to what I DON’T like about Wealthy Affiliate below. But, as I’ve already stated, overall I don’t know of any other place that is better for new affiliate marketers to get started than Wealthy Affiliate. If you take a look around my site, you’ll notice I’ve spent a TON of time on it. I’ve spent years of my life building this site, and there are currently almost 500 posts here, all for free, for everyone. It is in my best interest to promote only the best training course and that training course is Wealthy Affiliate.

Wealthy Affiliate provides lessons in both video and text format. In order to take video lessons, you must have internet connection. But, you can take those video lessons as many times, repeatedly as per your need. Not only those lessons, but if you join Wealthy Affiliate by clicking the link as above within our review, then we will be your sponsor and we can guide you step by step so that if you ever get confused anywhere in those lessons, you can just get help from us.
Thank you for your deep insight. I was looking for someone like you who would state the true. I did take notice about the “fishiness” of the site as soon as I got in; you need to “buy” comments, feedback and what not? How can that be of assistance to anyone? Of course, you can change your “magic money” for USD… It is not ethical for them to play with the desperation of the people.
Hi, could you give me some advice on how to set up a website elsewhere? I may decide to get my own domain one day and it certainly will not be feasible if I continue on Wealthy Affiliates. Basically, I need a good website to host my website for free for now and also the ability to move my domain over for a small fee if I wish to buy one in the future.
Direct marketing, using catalogues, was practiced in 15th-century Europe. The publisher Aldus Manutius of Venice printed a catalogue of the books he offered for sale. In 1667, the English gardener, William Lucas, published a seed catalogue, which he mailed to his customers to inform them of his prices. Catalogues spread to colonial America, where Benjamin Franklin is believed to have been the first cataloguer in British America. In 1744, he produced a catalogue of scientific and academic books.[6]
×