On MunchEye you can take a peak at the JV pages for these products, and on those pages they often show what the upsell funnel looks like. Some of them are utterly ridiculous, like you pay £4.99 for the front end product but there are £500 worth of upsells. And this is how affiliates are able to make so much money from these launches, because people get tricked into all these upsells.
Pretty awesome! Wealthy Affiliate sounds almost to good to be true. Everyone out there, scam or not (which is almost impossible to know off the bat), is asking for quite some money to provide you with training to make money online. WA not offers the most complete training but you can also host up to 50 sites with the fee you pay. I think it's definitely worth a look and I have begun my free training. From what I have seen up to now, I will become Premium very soon. I definitely like what's here. Thanks for writing this post. I (and many others) appreciate it!

There are probably hundreds of these blogs floating around, and some of them rank quite well. I guess one could give WA props for teaching some decent SEO techniques, but that seems to be about it. I find the “bait and switch” review tactic particularly nauseating. It’s quite obvious that most of these negative reviews are nothing more than “cookie cutter” posts, and that the “reviewer” hasn’t even personally gone through the product they are bashing. Anybody that writes reviews about products they don’t have themselves and know nothing about is a fraud as far as I’m concerned.
Although they have a specific skill-set based on proven direct marketing techniques, directed by the goal of motivating prospects to take a specific action[22], they also require a general and branding advertising focus on making current and potential customers feel a certain way about the product or service, and need the creativity shown in work such as "Don't treat your puppy like a dog" (Ralston Purina dog food)[23] or the "Pick-UPS" portion of 1-800-PICKUPS.

All direct marketing communications must include some method with which to track responses. A call to action might direct customers to call a specific number exclusive to that campaign, or to click on a link to a website with a landing page that exclusively handles responses from a given campaign (See also Post-Click Marketing). Direct marketers use the response-rate data to gauge how effective their communication is, and whether or not it needs to be changed for the next release. Such data is not only used to adjust the immediate campaign, but is also coordinated with data from other campaigns in order to present the direct marketing team with a better overall picture of their target markets. The data can then be used to more effectively optimize communication for specific market segments.
In 1872, Ward produced the first mail-order catalog for his Montgomery Ward mail order business. By buying goods and then reselling them directly to customers, Ward was consequently removing the middlemen at the general store and, to the benefit of the customer, drastically lowering the prices.[16] The Direct Mail Advertising Association, predecessor of the present-day Direct Marketing Association, was first established in 1917.[17] Third class bulk mail postage rates were established in 1928.[18]
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